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Why Psychologists Want You To Befriend People Who Swear A Lot

October 17, 2018 1 Comment

Why Psychologists Want You To Befriend People Who Swear A Lot

Why Psychologists Want You To Befriend People Who Swear A Lot

There’s a completely unfair misconception when it comes to those of us who enjoy the occasional swear word.

If you’re like me then you’re familiar with the judgey glares of onlookers as you drop the entire contents of your purse and whisper a simple, yet well-placed, “motherfucker”. Perhaps you’ve felt the side-eye of a passerby when you stub your toe and rightfully blurt out a “shit” or “damnit”. They think we're uneducated, classless, barbarians. But they're dead fucking wrong.

Multiple studies by psychologists indicate that these puritans should take their discriminatory looks elsewhere. In fact, these studies have come to the conclusion that those who swear make the best kind of friends because of their intelligence, self-awareness, and honesty.

WE'RE SMARTER:

According to one study by Psychologists Kristin Joy and Timothy Jay, the skills to create a new swear word is very closely related to having high vocabulary and fluency. That’s right - people with a high IQ tend to be more adept at coming up with novel swear words, and they use them liberally.

"People who use taboo words understand their general expressive content as well as nuanced distinctions that must be drawn to use them appropriately," the researchers wrote. "The ability to make nuanced distinction indicates the presence of more rather than less linguistic knowledge." 

WE MAKE GREAT FRIENDS:

And it doesn’t stop there. A separate study urges people to go even further and befriend those who swear a lot because they’re truer to their inner-self.

Individuals who tend to swear are more at ease with expressing themselves. It’s those that tend to mince their words or hold back entirely we should be wary of.

WE'RE HONEST AF:

A series of crime case studies examined whether or not honest people tend use more of our favorite four-letter words. They found that innocent suspects are more likely to curse than a guilty one. Not just that, but if you swear during a testimony, you are seen as more credible. 

So go ahead and keep it up fellow potty-mouthed brethren! Society could use more kind-hearted, honest individuals like us and our friends are lucky as hell to have us.

You’re welcome.

XOXO Tea & Sisterhood Forever,

Jenni-Lyn Williams

Love to drop an F-bomb?

We've got just the thing! At Snarky Tea we fully support and delight in your diverse use of the English language. Get a gift for yourself or let your bestie know how grateful you are to have them. The holidays are coming!

SNARKY TEA BOUQUET:

The full collection of Snarky Tea! This gift set comes wrapped like a half-dozen roses and is sure to delight any potty-mouthed pal.

GIFT SETS:

Shop all of our pre-made gift sets (like our "Sorry Things Suck Right Now" gift set, below) or make your own CUSTOM gift set! Don't you dare send another boring gift; give them something with use AND personality! 





1 Response

Tessa L.
Tessa L.

October 20, 2018

Fuck yes! My two girls & I have the worst potty mouths ever. it’s outstanding to know our MF’s are justified because we’re intelligent as hell!
We also are huge tea connoisseurs:)

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